luminarium exhibition


Cosmology, Celestial Mechanics & Eschatology

Paintings by local artist Dariana Arias
exhibited at the Latela Art Gallery
displayed from September 3 to November 6, 2016. 

Click here to open our Press Release.

Click here for our blog post with installation photographs + pics from opening night!

 

 

LatelaArtGallery-DarianaArias_Luminarium

About the Exhibition: 
Artist Statement


On September 14, 2015, LIGO detected gravitational waves originating 1.3 billion light years away, resulting from the collision of a massive pair of black holes. The discovery is said to go down in history as “one of the greatest scientific achievements,” given that it confirms Einstein’s ripples in space-time. The current exhibit, #Luminarium – Latin for ‘light’ - is my artistic rendition of the cosmos. The series takes inspiration from aforementioned discovery, my fascination with ancient cosmologies, as well as my interest in illuminated Ptolemaic diagrams. The exhibit explores the interaction between science-art-culture, seeking to understand its implications upon everyday Life.
 
As the exhibit’s title implies, Luminarium: Cosmology, Celestial Mechanics & Eschatology, the show features large-scale mixed media artworks focusing on three themes: observational astronomy, cosmological latitudes and cosmic eschatology. The exhibit is arranged by groupings of artworks sharing characteristics such as common theme, style and other technical details. The metallic colors are meant to be perceived as ‘electric’, random abstract planes entwined with intentional patterns that are symbolic of the chaos and order in creation. The gold-leaf brush strokes signify sacredness. The ‘warping’ of the gallery in a ‘different dimension’ is intended to facilitate an immersive experience.
 
#Luminarium is an artistic exploration of scientific matters, aimed at promoting the interdisciplinary exchange between art and science, within an artistic and educational environment, encouraging community engagement. In times when nuclear warfare and climate change seem to jeopardize life on our planet, we ought to consider the implications and applications of space exploration, astrophysical research and ancient astronomical data on modern society. To broaden consciousness and incite you to listen to those ‘whispers’ of the Universe, is my intention. 
 
From the edge of the universe, through the collision of two massive black holes, to apocalyptic dream-like escapes, #Luminarium poses the following question:
 
“LIGO, Sagittarius A, Gravitational Waves... Why should I care?"

About the artist:

Dariana Arias is a Latin-Caribbean artist based in Washington D.C.; she uses the creative process as the vehicle that enables her understanding of abstract ideas, via active imagination. Her artworks are intended to stimulate her audience –just like herself– to inquire about the nature of those very ideas, sparking the mind to wander beyond our physical plane, to the birthplace of new ideas. Dariana attended the George Washington University, and earned a degree in political science and philosophy.

Thank you to our Exhibition Sponsors:

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is designed to open the field of gravitational-wave astrophysics through the direct detection of gravitational waves predicted by Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. LIGO’s multi-kilometer-scale gravitational wave detectors use laser interferometry to measure the minute ripples in space-time caused by passing gravitational waves from cataclysmic cosmic sources such as the mergers of pairs of neutron stars or black holes, or by supernovae. LIGO consists of two widely separated interferometers within the United States—one in Hanford, Washington and the other in Livingston, Louisiana—operated in unison to detect gravitational waves.

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is designed to open the field of gravitational-wave astrophysics through the direct detection of gravitational waves predicted by Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. LIGO’s multi-kilometer-scale gravitational wave detectors use laser interferometry to measure the minute ripples in space-time caused by passing gravitational waves from cataclysmic cosmic sources such as the mergers of pairs of neutron stars or black holes, or by supernovae. LIGO consists of two widely separated interferometers within the United States—one in Hanford, Washington and the other in Livingston, Louisiana—operated in unison to detect gravitational waves.

Since 1987, Peter Weygandt of Weygandt-Metzler Importing has been an importer of top artisanal European wines. He has gained an international reputation for the quality and diversity of his selections. Weygandt Wines in Washington, DC, is the next natural step for Weygandt-Metzler: a retail store dedicated to showcasing Peter’s portfolio, from the most well-known viticultural regions and winemakers to lesser-known appellations as well as up-and-coming producers. It is a place where consumers can come to learn about the portfolio, and occasionally meet the importer and our winemakers.

Since 1987, Peter Weygandt of Weygandt-Metzler Importing has been an importer of top artisanal European wines. He has gained an international reputation for the quality and diversity of his selections. Weygandt Wines in Washington, DC, is the next natural step for Weygandt-Metzler: a retail store dedicated to showcasing Peter’s portfolio, from the most well-known viticultural regions and winemakers to lesser-known appellations as well as up-and-coming producers. It is a place where consumers can come to learn about the portfolio, and occasionally meet the importer and our winemakers.

Sweetdele's Sweet Treats is a local #MadeinDC small business that specializes in pound cakes, cookies and cupcakes. 

Sweetdele's Sweet Treats is a local #MadeinDC small business that specializes in pound cakes, cookies and cupcakes.